The 30 Most Frequent Quora Questions on Growth Hacking

Question 1: What is growth hacking?

Growth hacking is a process of rapid experimentation across channels, stages of the customer journey, product development paths, and sales processes that help us identify the most efficient ways to grow a business.

Most people think that growth hacking is about:

  • Quick wins

  • Low budget

  • Exponential growth

This is not necessarily wrong.

Growth hacking can indeed get you quick wins and exponential growth on a low budget.

Only this doesn’t happen often.

And, the reason why—when it happens—we discuss it a lot, is exactly because it’s rare.

Everyone wants to replicate growth from companies like Dropbox, Airbnb, and Robinhood.

All these companies had something in common:

They had a GREAT product.

You can’t talk about growth hacking if your product is not good.

The brutal truth?

That no growth hacking agency or growth hacker will ever tell you that.

Your product is your company’s growth lever.

If the quality of the product is there, everything else will follow.

So growth hacking is a great process but ONLY in the context of building a remarkable product that adds value to your customers’ lives.

Question 2: How can I become a growth hacker?

To become a growth hacker, you have to be ready to experiment.

You also have to be ready to fail, as experimentation is not always going to get you wins.

Many people think that growth hacking is about tools and quicks wins.

But, there is more in growth hacking than just tools and quick wins.

“Yes,” tools are important.

Are they enough?

Trust me; it’s not.

To become a growth hacker, you have to start caring about:

  • How your customers feel, AND

  • The value your product delivers to your customers.

Assuming that you become great in every aspect of growth hacking.

But, your product doesn’t retain the users you acquire.

What’s the point of acquiring these users?

The more you get, the more you lose.

This is why you should focus on the quality of your product and the value you deliver.

I am NOT saying that you shouldn’t acquire knowledge about growth hacking.

I am just saying that this knowledge won’t be enough unless you focus on improving the experience that your product offers.

And, to improve the experience, you have to start experimenting.

Do that, and you’ll be the best growth hacker there is.

Question 3: What are the best growth hacks for B2B startups?

There are many different growth hacks for B2B startups.

But, something that worked for someone else won’t necessarily work for you.

You should try to find your own growth hacks.

How can you achieve that?

Through experimentation.

Let me explain.

Something that worked for company A won’t necessarily work for company B.

This doesn’t mean that you should stay away from growth hacks.

You just have to try to find your own growth hacks.

“Yes,” the referral program is what drove growth for Dropbox.

But, this doesn’t mean that the same referral program will get growth for you, too.

You have to find your own way through success.

You have to write your own story.

Last but not least, finding a list of growth hacks is easy.

Execution is hard.

Instead of having the ideas or—in this case—a list of growth hacks, you should find out if you have the capabilities and resources to execute these ideas.

Do you see where I am going with this?

There is much more to growth hacking than “growth hacks.”

Try to discover the tactics that will help your own company grow and don’t limit yourself by trying out only growth hacks from other companies.

Question 4: What are some growth hacks for B2B SaaS companies?

There are many different growth hacks for B2B SaaS companies.

But, something that worked for someone else won’t necessarily work for you.

You should try to find your own growth hacks.

How can you achieve that?

Through experimentation.

Let me explain.

Something that worked for company A won’t necessarily work for company B.

This doesn’t mean that you should stay away from growth hacks.

You just have to try to find your own growth hacks.

“Yes,” the referral program is what drove growth for Dropbox.

But, this doesn’t mean that the same referral program will get growth for you, too.

You have to find your own way through success.

You have to write your own story.

Last but not least, finding a list of growth hacks is easy.

Execution is hard.

Instead of having the ideas or—in this case—a list of growth hacks, you should find out if you have the capabilities and resources to execute these ideas.

Do you see where I am going with this?

There is much more to growth hacking than “growth hacks.”

Try to discover the tactics that will help your own company grow and don’t limit yourself by trying out only growth hacks from other companies.

Question 5: What is the best way to learn Growth Hacking?

I’ll break this into two parts:

The first requires you to spend some time learning what growth hacking is all about.

You can watch online courses or read articles on growth hacking.

One tip here: don’t get too much into case studies and growth hacks from other successful companies.

These companies:

  • Were in a different lifecycle stage than yours,

  • Executed in a different way than you can execute,

  • Had different resources and capabilities than yours.

Acquiring knowledge around growth hacking is essential, and it’s definitely the first step to learn growth hacking.

What’s the second?

To start executing.

If you don’t put your knowledge into practice, you won’t be able to develop your skills as a growth hacker.

My advice here is this: fail, and adjust fast.

Don’t procrastinate and embrace failure as the best way to learn.

This is the best way to learn growth hacking.

Question 6: Is Growth Hacking nonsense?

It is not nonsense.

Unfortunately, with all the misinformation and misuse of the term, people tend to believe that growth hacking is about quick wins and silver bullets.

Growth hacking is NOT about quick wins and silver bullets.

And, what about the growth hacking agencies?

Well, in a research we did a while back, we discovered things that shocked us.

Be careful though: that doesn’t mean that all growth hacking agencies act in the same way.

Many growth hacking agencies are decent and respect both your money and time as a client.

So growth hacking is not nonsense.

It’s the way most “growth hackers” used the term from the very beginning back in 2010.

To form your own opinion, you should read and try to discover what growth hacking is all about.

When you do, you’ll find out that there is an amazing framework behind the term.

And, that this framework has to do with experimentation and not with quick wins, exponential growth or viral hacks.

Question 7: What companies are best at growth hacking?

Companies that are best at growth hacking:

  • Are not afraid to experiment (and fail),

  • Have a remarkable product,

  • Are great at executing.

You see, there is no secret recipe here.

Would Dropbox’s referral program have worked if Dropbox—as a product—wasn’t great?

Would Airbnb’s “Craigslist hack” have worked if the execution wasn’t good enough?

Would Hotmail’s infamous Email signature have worked if Hotmail didn’t have a set of loyal customers in the first place?

You can note a “no” in those three columns.

The companies that are the best at growth hacking pay attention to the product and know how to execute their ideas.

Question 8: What is the difference between product management and growth hacking?

The difference between product management and growth hacking is HUGE.

To begin with, product management has to do with:

  • Actions that are related to the product,

  • Managing the team that builds the product,

  • Building and optimizing product development processes.

On the other hand, growth hacking is:

A process of rapid experimentation across channels, stages of the customer journey, product development paths, and sales processes that help us identify the most efficient ways to grow a business.

A growth hacker has to care about the product and the value it delivers to customers.

But, she can’t be involved in every product-related process.

Similarly, a product manager has to:

  • Build new features,

  • Optimize the existing ones,

  • Manage the product team,

  • Set up product development processes.

“Yes,” both of them want a better product, and both of them want to grow the business.

They work together, but there are distinct differences between them.

Question 9: What is the best free tool for startups to do growth hacking?

Unfortunately, many people believe that growth hacking is about quick wins and cheap results.

However, growth hacking is NOT cheap results.

To be clear: I am not saying that you can’t get results with a low budget.

All I am saying is that this shouldn’t be your primary concern.

So the best free tool for startups to do growth hacking is EXPERIMENTATION.

Experimentation is the best way to discover what works and what isn’t working.

If you learn how to set up experiments, you won’t need as many tools, paid or free ones.

Don’t underestimate the value of experimentation.

Tools are great, but only if you use them for the right reasons.

And, when you do, great things can happen.

Question 10: What are the essential elements, methods or formulas of Growth Hacking?

Here they are:

1) Focus on the Quality of your Product

Many startup (and established) businesses falsely believe that growth hacking can work regardless of the quality of the product.

But, this is just wrong.

Do you think that companies like Dropbox, Airbnb, Hubspot, LinkedIn, or Quora made it to where they are today just because they are using cool growth hacking techniques?

The quality of your product should be the starting point of your growth strategy.

You can’t have growth without a GREAT product.

The sooner you understand this, the better.

2) Make Quick Decisions

Growth hacking is all about the moment, and growth hackers are people who take advantage of the momentum to attain growth.

Don’t wait for the ideal—in fact, the ideal is objective.

Making quick decisions don’t require know how or technical knowledge.

All you have to do is accept the fact that growth strategies need immediate action and quick decisions.

3) Focus on the Quality and Not the Number of your Experiments

As a growth hacker, you are responsible for setting up and running experiments. Using a/b testing to optimize experiments, monitor the conversion rate, and oversee the whole procedure.

Successful growth strategies come up not when we implement as many experiments as we can—they come up when we set up:

  • The right experiment

  • At the right time

  • And, with all the essential quality characteristics

Keep that in mind the next time you are going to set up an experiment.

4) Track Only What Matters & Optimize your Experiments

It’s easy to start measuring everything.

After all, this is a way to show the impact of your work.

But, your work as a growth hacker is NOT to track everything but to monitor only what matters.

Measure only things that have an impact on the business, and that help your company move forward.

5) Be Consistent With your Growth Hacking Process

Growth hacking is all about consistency.

Most failed startups wonder how success looks like because they stopped trying just before they see the first results coming.

A growth hacker has to be consistent with its efforts of driving growth.

Established business like Dropbox, Hubspot, or LinkedIn didn’t have a unique know how when they first started—but they were consistent with their efforts.

Consistency is what separates winners from losers.

The sooner you get this, the better.

These are the essential elements of growth hacking.

Which ones will you use first?

Question 11: What is the best growth hack you have used or heard of?

There are many different growth hacks.

But, something that worked for someone else won’t necessarily work for you.

Also, some things work faster and better than others.

What you should do is this:

Try to find your own growth hacks.

How can you achieve that?

Through experimentation.

Let me explain.

Something that worked for company A won’t necessarily work for company B.

This doesn’t mean that you should stay away from growth hacks.

You just have to try to find your own growth hacks.

“Yes,” the referral program is what drove growth for Dropbox.

But, this doesn’t mean that the same referral program will get growth for you, too.

You have to find your own way through success.

You have to write your own story.

Last but not least, finding “the best growth hack” is easy.

Execution is hard.

Instead of having the ideas or—in this case—a list of growth hacks, you should find out if you have the capabilities and resources to execute these ideas.

Do you see where I am going with this?

There is much more to growth hacking than “growth hacks.”

Try to discover the tactics that will help your own company grow and don’t limit yourself by trying out only growth hacks from other companies.

Question 12: Are there any companies offering Growth Hacking as a service, as there are many freelancers focusing on Growth Hacking consulting/advising? If yes, how does one validate the effectiveness of such a company, or even a freelancer?

Since 2010, when growth hacking was first introduced, there were many people who “jumped into the growth hacking ship.”

Still, many agencies offer growth hacking as a service.

There are also many freelancers who work as growth hackers.

The problem with the majority of them?

  1. They will send you a proposal without a discovery of your problems,

  2. They will talk more about themselves rather than you,

  3. They will try to sell you services that you don’t need,

  4. They will give you promises they can’t keep,

  5. They will use complex words and jargon,

  6. They will have a junior marketer handle your account.

 I am not exaggerating.

This is what we discovered when we went undercover to uncover the scam behind growth hacking agencies. 

What can you do to protect your company?

  • Ask them if they are willing to water down their growth hacking process for you; if they are, then chances are, they don’t know what they are doing.

  • Ask them if they can guarantee results; if they can, and especially before running any test whatsoever, then they are setting the wrong expectations.

  • Ask for testimonials and jump on calls with previous customers; don’t just take their word for things, do your research.

  • Ask them to share with you one failed case study and ask what did that taught them; learnings from failed strategies are equally as crucial as learnings from successful strategies.

  • Ask them to share with you a case study where they didn’t do what the client asked for, and it paid out; if they have such a case, it means that they believe in their work and the overall process.

  • Ask them if they have experience in your niche; it is always better to choose someone who has a solid understanding of the market you are into.

If you want to dive deeper into this, download this Checklist and you’ll get all the answers you need.

Question 13: What is your favorite growth hacking tip?

Stop reading; start executing.

You can read books, blog posts, watch YouTube videos and buy online courses— 

But, if you don’t start executing you won’t be able to move the needle.

You don’t need tips and let me give you a couple of strong reasons:

  • Tips are usually tactics that worked for others; that doesn’t mean they are going to work for you.

  • Tips are useless if you don’t put them into practice.

So my advice is this: stop reading and do whatever you can to put what you’ve learned so far into practice.

Make mistakes, follow the wrong paths, and don’t be afraid to fail.

Execution: this is my favorite growth hacking tip.

Question 14: Can you share links to great growth hacking resources? 

If you are just starting out, I would suggest that you visit the following links:

Blog Post: An Introduction to Growth Marketing

eBook: The Definitive Guide to Growth Hacking

Book: Hacking Growth: How Today’s Fastest-Growing Companies Drive Breakout Success

Online Course: Growth Marketing Training

Choose the format that best suits you and start learning about growth hacking.

Question 15: Is there a growth hacking consultancy agency for hire for startups?

There are many growth hacking agencies available for hire.

But, before you hire one, you might want to consider the following:

1) Most Growth Hacking Agencies Don’t Have a Clear Discovery Process

Why is that important?

Because through the Discovery Process, the agency (or the consultant) can identify the problem.

And, by identifying the problem, they can suggest relevant solutions.

2) Most Growth Hacking Agencies Send Rushed Proposals

This is a point you should pay attention to. Most agencies will try to close you (as a client) as quick as possible.

Is their solution relevant to your problem? Are the expectations they set realistic? Are the data used in the proposals real?

These are some questions that you need to ask yourself before hiring an agency.

3) Most Agencies Use Complex Buzzwords & Jargon

This is another point you should pay attention to.

Don’t be impressed by complex words and marketing jargon you don’t understand.

How can you beat that?

Ask them to explain everything in plain English so that you can make a thoughtful decision.

4) Most Agencies Talk About Themselves Rather Than Your Needs and Problems

You don’t need me to tell you that most agencies use the word “We” more than the word “You.”

And, you don’t need me to tell you what this implies.  

Narcissism is another critical point; a point you should pay attention to before hiring an agency.

You may be wondering:  

How do I know all that?

A couple of months ago, we conducted an undercover research to uncover the scam behind growth hacking agencies.

What have we discovered?

You can find everything in our research.

After reading it, you can’t say that you didn’t know…

Question 16: How can I growth hack to get 1 million sign-ups in 6 months on my website?

Robinhood—the popular stock-trading app—managed to get 1 million users with their pre-launch campaign.

Having 1 million users in your pre-launch campaign means that you have 1 million users when practically your company doesn’t exist yet.

At least your product doesn’t.  

Why are case studies like Robinhood so popular?

Because the results they achieved are rare. 

Getting from 0 to 1 million sign-ups in 6 months is NOT EASY.

The question, though, shouldn’t be how to get from 0 to 1 million subscribers.

The question should be:

What will I do with those x subscribers once they opt-in?

If you don’t have a plan to retain or engage those users once they sign-up, then no growth hack will help you achieve your goal.

So I believe that you should change your route and from focusing on the number of sign-ups, to start focusing on what you are going to do with these sign-ups.

Assuming that you have 1 million subscribers tomorrow:

Do you know how to handle them? Do you know how to keep them engaged? Do you know how to monetize your list of subscribers?

If the answer is “no,” then you need a different approach and a different plan.

Question 17: What are some growth hacks for user retention for SaaS startups?

There is only one growth hack for SaaS startup:

Understanding what users need and want and try to give it to them.

Don’t look for silver bullets and quick wins.

Most of these tactics are only going to help you in the short-term.

The best way to retain your users is by understanding their needs, and by turning those needs into features.

To be clear: this doesn’t mean that you should build a feature for every need your users have.

However, when you identify a pattern, something that many people need and have to deal with daily, then this might be an opportunity for product development.

So my advice here is this:

Don’t look for hacks; start listening to your users.

This is the best growth hacking you can ever apply.

Question 18: What is the difference between growth hacking and inbound marketing?

Growth hacking is a process of rapid experimentation across channels, stages of the customer journey, product development paths, and sales processes that help us identify the most efficient ways to grow a business. 

Most people think that growth hacking is about:

  • Quick wins

  • Low budget

  • Exponential growth

If only that was true.

Growth hacking is NOT about quicks wins and cheap results.

“Yes,” this may happen sometimes, but it’s not the norm.

On the other hand, inbound marketing is a way of attracting potential customers by providing valuable information to the problems they have.

By answering their questions and by providing actionable tactics that can help them overcome their problems, you create a relationship with your potential customers.

This relationship may lead to a sale or another meaningful action, both for you and them.

As you can see, running experiments to discovery channels that will help you grow—which is what growth hacking does—is different.

Even though your question is good, I believe that you should focus not on the differences between the two, but on the way to combine them to optimize your overall performance.

By using both growth hacking and inbound marketing, you can build a machine that generates leads and new customers and ultimately helps your business grow

Question 19: Where can we go to learn about all the steps in the Growth Hacking funnel (AARRR)?

I have three resources for you:

Online Course: Growth Marketing Training

1st Blog Post: An Introduction to Growth Marketing

2nd Blog Post: Why the AARRR Framework is not for Everyone (Explained with Examples)

I believe these are enough to get you started.

Question 20: Is growth hacking really just clever marketing?

No, it’s not.

And, this is one of the many misunderstandings when it comes to growth hacking.

Growth hacking and marketing are two different concepts.

Their departments in a company function differently and employees in each department do different things.

But, growth hacking is NOT clever marketing.

Growth hacking can be an unexpected, smart way to bring a good result using an unconventional tactic.It can work only through experimentation.

And, this is one of the main differences between growth hacking and marketing.

Also, most of the time, growth hacking is not about:

  • Quick wins

  • Low budget

  • Exponential growth

Growth hacking gives you the intelligence you need to grow your business.

In some cases, it may give you the intelligence you need to do better marketing.

But, that doesn’t make it clever marketing.

Through a process of constant experimentation, you can identify patterns, discover opportunities, and find ways to grow

Question 21: Growth Hacking: What existing services will allow me to imitate Robinhood.com’s waiting list?

Robinhood—the popular stock-trading app—managed to get 1 million users with their pre-launch campaign.

Having 1 million users in your pre-launch campaign means that you have 1 million users when practically your company doesn’t exist yet.

At least your product doesn’t.

Why are case studies like Robinhood so popular?

Because the results they achieved are so rare.

Getting from 0 to 1 million sign-ups in 6 months is NOT EASY.

The question, though, shouldn’t be how to get from 0 to 1 million subscribers or how to replicate that success.

The question should be:

Why do you want to replicate it, and how are you going to maintain it?

If you don’t have a plan to retain or engage those users once they sign-up, then there is no growth hack that will help you achieve your goal.

So I believe that you should change your route and shift from focusing on replicating Robinhood’s success, to focusing on what you are going to do with these sign-ups.

Assuming that you have 1 million subscribers tomorrow. 

Do you know how to handle them? Do you know how to keep them engaged? Do you know how to monetize your list of subscribers?

If the answer is “no,” then you need a different approach and a different plan.

Question 22: What’s the best updated guide on growth hacking?

Here are some grt resources on growth hacking:

Online Course: Growth Marketing Training

1st Blog Post: An Introduction to Growth Marketing

2nd Blog Post: Why the AARRR Framework is not for Everyone (Explained with Examples)

3rd Blog Post: The Do’s and Don’ts of Growth Marketing

4th Blog Post: 6 Ways Growth Marketing Can Help Your Startup

These are enough to get you started.

Question 23: H did you choose your growth hacking techniques?

The best way to develop your growth hacking techniques is through experimentation.

Everyone can find their own growth hacking techniques through experimentation.

You can’t just “choose your growth hacking techniques;” not until you start experimenting.

Experimentation will help you identify the best paths and tactics to grow your business.

Most people get that wrong.

They believe that something that worked for someone else will work for them as well.

But, this is a false approach.

Something that worked for someone else won’t necessarily work for you.

This is why you can’t choose your growth hacking techniques.

You experiment and develop them; you don’t get to choose them.

Question 24: What is a growth hack?

A growth hack is an unexpected, smart way to bring a good result using an unconventional tactic.

To find a growth hack, you have to experiment.

 Some comn myths about growth hacks are:

  • Growth hacks are cheap marketing tricks